Archive for 'Wild Edible Notebook'

Wild Edible Notebook—June 2014 Release!

Fireweed flower 450x337 Wild Edible Notebook—June 2014 Release!

Fireweed is the featured edible flora of the June 2014 Wild Edible Notebook!

June2014 cover 800 343x450 Wild Edible Notebook—June 2014 Release!Everywhere I look, there is fireweed shooting up. It’s so common, you might think it were a weed, but in fact fireweed is native to high country Colorado, as it is to mountainous regions and northern latitudes around the world. Fireweed, also known as great willowherb, is edible, though in my opinion the culinary value of most parts is a tad dubious. Still, that doesn’t keep me from trying, and there is much to be learned from this beautiful, tall, fuschia-flowering plant. Please, join me on a journey through time and space with fireweed, a lovely wild plant whose mysteries we can perhaps unravel together. Subscribe for just $2 a month to the Wild Edible Notebook for the full story.

$2 for 6 Issues including this one

For the first $2, you access six Notebooks. That’s pretty cheap. You could cancel after just $2 if you really wanted to. Or, you could read six colorful, well-researched, slightly snarky issues and decide $2 is a small price to pay to get these photo-filled glossies in three different formats each month. Thanks so much if you decide to support this. It is a lifestyle choice to which I find myself compelled despite many more practical decisions I could be making. Instead I fill my time researching, hunting, photographing, picking, cooking and eating, and writing about edible wild plants. So your contribution helps to make this work possible. I spend about 80 hours per month on these and draw a very small monthly paycheck. Currently I gross $2.75 an hour for my work on these. I am not like so many others who made their money in the real world and then retired from it to chase their dreams but with full pocketbooks. I retired from it before making much money. Good move, WFG. Anyhoo, the money goes towards life expenses as would a job, also to the web expenses. The programmer gets paid with wild dinner and kisses. I hope to pay cash money to the contributors one day.

How to Get Free Issues

Check out the two free issues by joining the email list (scroll to the very bottom of this page and type your name and email address). After that if you cannot afford it but are enamored of the Notebook and vow to read it every month, I sometimes give offers via email for how to get a free subscription. But just remember, I’m making $2.75 an hour, covered head-to-toe in poison ivy. Just kidding. The poison ivy is only on my arm. But seriously.

Screenshot TOC1 343x450 Wild Edible Notebook—June 2014 Release!June 2014 Wild Edible Notebook
  • Fireweed -Fireweed is the cover story for the June 2014 issue of the Wild Edible Notebook.
  • Three-Leaved Sumac, Sumacs, & Poisonous Relatives - Next is a piece on three-leaved sumac—which produces tart, edible, red “berry” clusters earlier than its cousins, staghorn and smooth sumac—along with a nod to those cousins and their poisonous relatives poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac too. As if the universe thought the timing appropriate, one of those three is currently itching the heck out of my left arm.
  • Book Review: Ellen Zachos’ Backyard Foraging -There is a review of Ellen Zachos’ book, Backyard Foraging, a colorful, easy-to-follow guide to edible garden ornamentals and common weeds that would make a good gift for the wild-edible-curious gardener in your life.
  • Poem -I have only ever featured two poems in the Wild Edible Notebook—two awesome ones by my sometimes-muse, Brad Purcell. But this time, I wrote one. Please enjoy my reflective ode to mud. And by all means, send me your wild poems.
  • Recipes -Each issue of WEN concludes with recipe ideas using wild food. In this issue, there are a couple for smooth sumac from my dear friend and fellow bloggist, Hunger & Thirst. From me there is a bit on wilted wild greens, a rework from the blog with a few new pictures. Even though that story has run here already, I find it’s nice to have the recipe in portable format.
Final Pitch (Just Read It)

This seems a good time for a plug. The Wild Edible Notebook is available for iPad (best) and iPhone in Apple’s Newsstand application. Or you can subscribe here at the blog for access to three different formats of PDFs—a screen reader that happens to fit the iPad perfectly, a skinny, tall version that is meant to be decent on an Android, and the original gangster print-and-fold format. You need to know how to operate your printer, or take a PDF file to a copy shop, to get these printouts to work. Also it’s extra lovely now on the 8.5 x 14” legal-paper size printout. Get the right paper, print two sided, and fold for cute, reproducible booklets in full color if you want. There are even coloring pages for the wild edible kiddos in your life!

The print-and-fold is still my favorite–I print it in black and white–because then if I’m cooking and want to refer to recipe without turning on my electronic devices, I can just consult my wild edible library of printed Notebooks. See Wild Edible Notebook for details on the different formats available, and to subscribe. You know you wanna. Tee hee. Thanks for reading this far. You rock. Happy foraging!

Orache is Not the Same as Lambs’ Quarters

orache plant2 450x337 Orache is Not the Same as Lambs’ Quarters

Orache looks a lot like lambs’ quarters, to which it is related. But, it’s a different plant.

One of my absolute favorite wild veggies is orache, an herbaceous, annual member of the genus Atriplex that grows in the alkaline soil of Denver, Colorado and surrounding areas. Oraches are salt-loving plants, so in addition to salt playas in landlocked regions, species can also be found along coastlines and even along roadsides where the soil or sand is saline.

Orache looks a lot like the edible wild spinach “goosefoot” or “lambs’ quarters” (Chenopodium album and related), so much so that when I posted a Facebook picture of the orache I was eating, along with a caption that said “orache,” more than one person commented how much they liked lambs’ quarters!

Both orache and lambs’ quarters have green to greenish-blue leaves that are covered, particularly on the underside and growing tips, with a white, mealy substance upon which water balls up and runs off. Like those of the goosefoots, the flowers that come later don’t look much like flowers at all, but rather small clumps clustered on the upper parts of the stems.

Read the rest of this entry

Wild Edible Notebook—April 2014 Release!

WEN April 2014 cover 800 343x450 Wild Edible Notebook—April 2014 Release!Here in the offices of the Wild Edible Notebook we are starting to get very excited for spring—for all the wandering and wondering to ensue as the snow melts and the green plants push their way forth once more. The April 2014 issue is special in a number of ways. For one, it’s longer, including four feature stories in place of three, two of which are by fabulous guest authors.

First is a song of almost-spring by none other than Wisconsin forager Samuel Thayer, who begins each season in the sugar woods, tapping maples and hauling buckets of sap through the snow to make syrup. If you take your foraging seriously, you know his books—Nature’s Garden (2010) and The Forager’s Harvest (2006)—and you know that he is not only a master forager and serious scholar, but also a great writer.

Then, because spring happens a little later here at 10,000 feet in the Colorado high country than it does in parts lower, I decided to focus on a few early plants to be found in Denver and comparable locations. My stories include a tour of some wild mustards as well as an expanded bit on wild lettuces. Members of both groups are found here in the West but also throughout the U.S. and abroad.

Next is a piece on the many edible parts of evening primrose by my BFF (Best Foraging Friend) Wendy Petty, whom you might know as Butter, the blogger behind Hunger & Thirst. Butter penned this story special for the Wild Edible Notebook, on the condition that I hurry up and finish my winter work season so we can get on with our foraging adventures.

As usual, a handful of recipes for wild food cookery round out the magazine.

The Wild Edible Notebook is an ongoing project, started in 2011. It is now available for iPad and iPhone in the Apple Newsstand, or in various PDF formats including screen-reading and 8.5×14” print-and-fold versions at www.wildfoodgirl.com/wild-edible-notebook for $1.99/month. Your support makes the continued development of this publication possible, both on the content and technical sides. Big, squeezy, wild hugs to those who have already purchased a subscription in support of this effort.

To download a free issue of the Wild Edible Notebook and stay abreast of future developments, join the email list by filling out your info at the very bottom of the page.

Wild Edible Notebook—March 2014 Release!

March 2014 cover 800 343x450 Wild Edible Notebook—March 2014 Release!Wild sea vegetables are hard to come by here in the Colorado high country, so for the March 2014 issue of the Wild Edible Notebook I decided to travel through space and time to coastal Connecticut via several jars of seaweed—Irish moss (Chondrus crispus), sea lettuce (Ulva sp.) and sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima)—that I collected last summer and dried in my parents’ house.

While researching the story I was fortunate to tap into the expertise of Dr. Charles Yarish, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Connecticut, who promotes the cultivation of sea vegetables as a means to clean coastal waters while also providing good food for the dinner plate. This edition also includes a lighthearted jaunt into wild jellies and things to make with them besides toast. The issue concludes with a handful of recipes using wild foraged seaweeds, including one by West Coast seaweed purveyor Louise Gaudet, as well as a recipe for serviceberry jelly pork glaze by the awesome cook that is my dad.

The Wild Edible Notebook is an ongoing project, started in 2011. It is now available for iPad and iPhone in the Apple Newsstand, or in various PDF formats including screen-reading and 8.5×14” print-and-fold versions at www.wildfoodgirl.com/wild-edible-notebook for $1.99/month. Your support makes the continued development of this publication possible, both on the content and technical sides. Big, super-squeezy, wild hugs to those who have already purchased a subscription in support of this effort.

To download a free issue of the Wild Edible Notebook and stay abreast of future developments, join the email list by filling out your info at the very bottom of the page.

Wild Edible Notebook—February 2014 Release!

February2014 cover 800 343x450 Wild Edible Notebook—February 2014 Release!Winter marches on here in the Colorado high country, and I find myself more eager than ever to hunt for wild food, so for this month’s edition of the Wild Edible Notebook I decided to venture deep into the snowy forest to fill my pockets with the wind-felled boughs of pine, spruce, and fir, and then try to figure out what to do with them in the kitchen. In the process I have discovered how beautiful it is to view the snowy landscape through a forager’s eyes, finding that even in the heart of winter there is food—albeit primarily in the form of tea and spice—for the taking.

The February 2014 Wild Edible Notebook centers on conifers—first on the needles borne by the tall trees that make up our forests here in the high country, followed by a piece on juniper “berries,” which are not berries at all but instead cones. After that there is a review of Jennifer Hahn’s Pacific Feast: A Cook’s Guide to West Coast Foraging. This month’s edition concludes with a handful of fun recipes using conifer needles by yours truly as well as the talented culinarian Wendy Petty of Hunger & Thirst.

The Wild Edible Notebook is an ongoing project, started in 2011. It is now available for iPad and iPhone in the Apple Newsstand, or in various PDF formats including screen-reading and 8.5×14” print-and-fold versions at www.wildfoodgirl.com/wild-edible-notebook for $1.99/month. Your support makes the continued development of this publication possible, both on the content and technical sides. Big, squeezy, wild hugs to those who have already purchased a subscription in support of this effort.

To download a free issue of the Wild Edible Notebook and stay abreast of future developments, join the email list by filling out your info at the very bottom of the page.

Wild Edible Notebook—January 2014 Release!

January 2013 cover 800 343x450 Wild Edible Notebook—January 2014 Release!The New Year arrived with more than a foot of fresh snow here in the Colorado high country, where we are under more than four feet and counting. Thus, for the January 2014 edition of the Wild Edible Notebook, I turned to wild seeds—from dock seeds and goosefoot to prickly pear—and the myriad joys of rubbing, winnowing, soaking, sprouting, grinding, and cooking them. Have you ever grown winter sprouts from wild seeds? Very exciting!

After the seed stories, we take a tour of Hank Shaw’s recently released Duck, Duck, Goose, a cookbook devoted entirely to the preparation of waterfowl. Hank was kind enough to donate a recipe to the Wild Edible Notebook, too, so if you can scare up the wild duck, wild duck eggs, bulrushes and hand-foraged wild rice, you might just be up to the challenge of making it. A handful of my own recipes with wild seeds concludes the January 2014 edition, along with one I sneaked in that uses domesticated seeds, but dressed in a rich coat of wild-foraged porcini powder.

The Wild Edible Notebook is an ongoing project, started in 2011. It is now available for iPad and iPhone in the Apple Newsstand, or in various PDF formats including screen-reading and 8.5×14” print-and-fold versions at www.wildfoodgirl.com/wild-edible-notebook for $1.99/month. Your support makes the continued development of this publication possible, both on the content and technical sides. Big, squeezy, wild hugs to those who have already purchased a subscription in support of this effort.

To download a free issue of the Wild Edible Notebook and stay abreast of future developments, join the email list by filling out your info at the very bottom of the page.

Wild Edible Notebook—December Release!

WEN cover Dec2013 800 343x450 Wild Edible Notebook—December Release!Thanksgiving has passed. Are you starting to think about Christmas? Because you’d be hard-pressed to think of a better gift for the forager in your life (no, really) than a subscription to the Wild Edible Notebook, a quirky monthly magazine about stuff you can eat in the wild!

To whet your appetite, the just-released December 2013 issue looks at two edible parts of Opuntia prickly pear cactus—the flat paddles or pads, and the prickly fruits that adorn them in fall—along with how to defuse the spines, both obvious and innocuous, before you put that cactus in your mouth. After that we peer into my dark pantry to see what wild alcohol infusions are a’brewing, followed by a virtual journey to the warmth and diversity of central Florida’s foraging scene, which you can follow up with an actual trip to this year’s Florida Herbal Conference if you feel so inclined. There is also an interview with Florida forager Green Deane of www.eattheweeds.com, who will be conducting plant walks at the conference. As always, recipes and classifieds conclude the month’s edition.

The Notebook is an ongoing project, started in 2011. It is now available for iPad and iPhone in the Apple Newsstand, or in various PDF formats including screen-reading and 8.5×14” print-and-fold versions at www.wildfoodgirl.com/wild-edible-notebook for $1.99/month. Your support makes the continued development of this publication possible, both on the content and technical sides. Big, squeezy, wild hugs to those who have already purchased a subscription in support of this effort.

To download a free issue of the Wild Edible Notebook and stay abreast of future developments, join the email list by filling out your info at the very bottom of the page.

Wild Edible Notebook—November Release!

WEN cover Nov 2013 800 338x450 Wild Edible Notebook—November Release!Surprise! The November 2013 issue of the Wild Edible Notebook is here, just three weeks after last month’s release. This issue is 10 pages longer than last month’s, with new sections including an editor’s letter, a clickable table of contents, and a collection of letters, notes, and quotes.

In this issue, we invite you to stare into a washbasin of slow-leaching acorn meal as we peruse the literature and consult with experts, including East Coast forager Arthur Haines, on how best to process acorns for consumption. Next comes an extended take on black walnuts, a journey inspired by my mother’s not-so-successful experience processing black walnuts in Connecticut and culminating in a Boulder, Colorado-area farm field. There’s a review of a new Falcon Guide to edible wild plants in the Rocky Mountains, and a handful of acorn and black walnut recipes from yours truly and my good friend and foraging partner in crime, Butter.

Past Notebooks have focused primarily on edible wild plants high in the Colorado Rockies, often at 10,000 feet and above. This issue, however, spans a wider range, in response to requests from a recent reader survey.

About the Wild Edible Notebook

The Notebook is an ongoing project, started in 2011. In the last two months it underwent a major overhaul and is now available for iPad and iPhone in the Apple Newsstand, or in various PDF formats including a screen-reader, a tall & skinny Android-optimized PDF, and 8.5×14” print-and-fold booklet.

The procedure for downloading the Wild Edible Notebook has changed. Please visit the Wild Edible Notebook page for information on subscribing to the iPad/iPhone or PDF versions for $1.99/month. Your support makes the continued development of this publication possible, both on the content and technical sides.

I cannot overstate how thankful I am for those of you who already purchased a subscription in support of this effort. Maybe all caps will do the trick: THANK YOU SO MUCH!

To download a free issue of the Wild Edible Notebook and stay abreast of future developments, join the email list by filling out your info at the very bottom of the page.

—WFG

Wild Edible Notebook available on iPad

ipad screenshot2 Wild Edible Notebook web 450x358 Wild Edible Notebook available on iPad

The Wild Edible Notebook is now available for iPad, can you believe it? You could drink coffee while reading it, or better yet, try some chicory, dandelion, or chaga…

Great news! The Wild Edible Notebook is now available on iPad, in the form of an online magazine in the Apple Newsstand.

The Wild Edible Notebook is the publication I’ve been doing seasonally since 2010. It contains first-hand, informative, and sometimes silly edible plant accounts interwoven with research, book reviews, forager spotlights, and recipes. Captioned photos of plants and cookery help to paint the full picture.

This year, in response to popular demand, the Notebook is going year-round for the first time ever.

If you have an iPad and want to check out the magazine, click on Wild Edible Notebook, or go to the Newsstand app on your iPad (it looks like bookshelves with magazines on it) and search for “Wild Edible Notebook.”

The way it works is this:

  1. You download the Wild Edible Notebook app for free. (The Notebook is optimized for iOS6, with the iOS7 optimization pending, so if you are on an old operating system, it’s time to do your update. Go to Settings>General>Software Update and make sure you have your Apple ID and Password ready.)
  2. Then you can access the previously released August 2013 issue for free. It has been newly formatted to fit the dimensions of the iPad display. This should make the process much easier for those who have iPads. Also, the photos are so much nicer in high def!
  3. The paid subscription, which currently includes the reformatted September 2013 issue and monthly issues after that, costs $1.99/month. Read the rest of this entry

Wild Edible Notebook—September release!

September 2013 cover 800 288x450 Wild Edible Notebook—September release!September is well on its way, and with it I am happy to announce the release of another Wild Edible Notebook for your reading pleasure. The September 2013 edition is four pages longer than the last, making it the longest Wild Edible Notebook I’ve created to date.

This issue revisits the low-lying high country huckleberries of the genus Vaccinium, a topic I picked based on reader interest. Next is a journey into the wonderful world of hawk’s wings mushrooms (Sarcodon imbricatus), followed by the story of an even more wonderful culinary journey undertaken in partnership with Chef Bill Greenwood of Beano’s Cabin restaurant in Beaver Creek. This edition also includes a review of The Complete Guide to Edible Wild Plants, Mushrooms, Fruits, and Nuts: How to Find, Identify and Cook Them (2010) by Virginia-based forager Katie Letcher Lyle. Mushroom recipes dominate the recipe section—a few by me, one from my dad, and a recipe for stewed chanterelles from Lyle. Last but not least is a huckleberry coloring page, and an announcement about the 3rd Annual Florida Herbal Conference, coming up in February/March of 2014.

The procedure for downloading the Wild Edible Notebook has changed. Please visit the Wild Edible Notebook page for information on subscribing to the iPad/iPhone or PDF versions for $1.99/month. Your support makes the continued development of this publication possible, both on the content and technical sides.

To download a free issue of the Wild Edible Notebook and stay abreast of future developments, please join the email list by filling out your info at the very bottom of this website. Thanks!

EDITED 10.7.13 to reflect the new download procedures.

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